Loading...

RESEARCHERS

Home / 

ANA GRICIUC, PH.D.

Dr. Ana Griciuc received her M.Eng. in biotechnology from INSA-Lyon and M.Sc. in biochemistry from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology (Munich) in 2006. She then became a fellow of the European Union research training network “Marie Curie-Neurotrain” and received her PH.D. degree in neurobiology from the Helmholtz Research Center

KAREN DUFF, PH.D.

“I like getting older. As one gets older, it gets easier to think. Because of recent advancements such as imaging techniques, and the recognition of the combined role of amyloid and tau, I’m more excited now, more optimistic, that I was just five or ten years ago.” Among the researchers

MURALI DORAISWAMY, M.D.

Dr. Murali Doraiswamy is a Professor of Translational Neuroscience as well as Director of the Neurocognitive Disorders Program in the Department of Psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center. He also serves on the Executive Committee of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences and as a Senior Fellow at the Duke

BEVERLY L. DAVIDSON, PH.D.

Dr. Davidson received her PH.D.in biological chemistry from the University of Michigan and in 1994 was recruited to the University of Iowa, where she was promoted to Associate Professor in 1999 and Professor in 2001. From 1999–2014 she held the Roy J. Carver Chair in Biomedical Research, and was named

CARMELA R. ABRAHAM, PH.D.

Carmela R. Abraham, PH.D. has devoted her entire career to the study of Alzheimer’s disease. She obtained her PH.D. in neuroscience at Harvard University. She then moved to Boston University School of Medicine where she is a professor of biochemistry and pharmacology, and experimental therapeutics. Her laboratory studies the basic

RUDY TANZI, PH.D.

Dr. Tanzi co-discovered three of the first Alzheimer’s disease genes and has identified several others in the Alzheimer’s Genome Project, which he directs. He also discovered the Wilson’s disease gene and participated in the discovery of several other neurological disease genes. Most recently, he has used Alzheimer’s disease genes to